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PARADE promises more Latinos in 2013.

Starting this Sunday, PARADE Magazine, the nation’s most widely read magazine in the US with a reported circulation of 32.5 million and readership of nearly 60 million, promises to feature more Latinos than ever on their weekly publication.

Why?  Why now?  You might ask. 

Because, as the press materials that were sent to me earlier today explain:  “As Barack Obama prepares to take the oath of office next week, it is worth reflecting on one of the major factors that impacted his reelection last November: the strong support of Hispanics, America’s largest minority group.  That’s why, starting with this Sunday’s issue and continuing throughout 2013, PARADE magazine will be exploring the ways Latinos are reshaping America in a series titled “PARADE of Voices.”

What do you think?   Are you looking forward to this new series in PARADE Magazine?

To kick off the special, the publication sat down for a roundtable discussion with San Antonio mayor Julián Castro; Republican state representative Larry Gonzales; Linda Alvarado, president and CEO of Denver’s Alvarado Construction and a co-owner of MLB’s Colorado Rockies; Cristina Jiménez, managing director of United We Dream; and NBC Today anchor Natalie Morales.

Here is a preview of what they had to say:

When I think of what Latinos are going to mean to the United States as the population grows, it’s going to be a replenishment of exactly what made the United States a great nation: a great work ethic, faith, aspiration, community. —Julián Castro

It’s about opportunity and access. Those are American ideas, not just Hispanic ideas. … What we’re looking for in America—like in baseball—is the opportunity to try [to find] that level playing field.” —Linda Alvarado

There’s a certain brain drain in this country. When these undocumented students are graduating in STEM fields—science, technology, engineering, and math—we want them to stay.  We need that kind of brain trust.” —Larry Gonzales

I grew up here as an undocumented student. Everything around me said, No. No scholarship, no fellowship, no internship, no access to higher education. What makes me proud is the community and my family around me really pushing me, with a lot of courage and faith, to continue moving forward.” —Cristina Jiménez

Will you be picking up an issue?

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